Lost Limbs Foundation

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Haunter Taos, New Mexico

History and Haunting of:
Taos Pueblo,Taos, New Mexico, USA

Ghosts are as big a part of the Taos landscape as are the living.
The first thing you notice upon entering Taos Pueblo—the northernmost of 19 Pueblo Indian tribes in New Mexico—is a peaceful silence.It is the spirituality of Taos Pueblo that hangs on the air and envelopes you as soon as you walk onto Pueblo land
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History and Haunting of:
 Taos Pueblo,Taos, New Mexico, USA

Ghosts are as big a part of the Taos landscape as are the living.
 The first thing you notice upon entering Taos Pueblo—the northernmost of 19 Pueblo Indian tribes in New Mexico—is a peaceful silence.It is the spirituality of Taos Pueblo that hangs on the air and envelopes you as soon as you walk onto Pueblo land
Archeological remains within the Taos Valley date its earliest known human occupation to around 900 AD. Various precontact Anasazi tribes are believed to have moved into the area around this time, sticking close to the life-sustaining Rio Grande River tributaries around the present-day border of Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico. Traditions surrounding the Taos Pueblo eventually emerged out of the various cultures present in the valley. The original pueblo site is directly east of where the adobes stand today. Likely constructed around 1325 AD, the first Taos Pueblo is now a ruin and sacred site referred to as “Cornfield Taos.” The limited archeological excavation at Cornfield Taos provided evidence that the Pueblo relocated slightly to the west to its current location, around 1400 AD – though at present it is not clear why.Pueblo prayer included substances as well as words; one common prayer material was ground-up maize—white cornmeal. Thus a man might bless his son, or some land, or the town by sprinkling a handful of meal as he uttered a blessing. Once, after the 1692 re-conquest, the Spanish were prevented from entering a town when they were met by a handful of men who uttered imprecations and cast a single pinch of a sacred substance.

The Puebloans employed prayer sticks, which were colorfully decorated with beads, fur, and feathers; these prayer sticks (or talking sticks) were also used by other nations.

By the 13th century, Puebloans used turkey feather blankets for warmth. Cloth and weaving were known to the Puebloans before the conquest, but it is not known whether they knew of weaving before or after the Aztecs. But since clothing was expensive, they did not always dress completely until after the conquest, and breechcloths were not uncommon.

Corn was a staple food for the Pueblo people. They were what was called "dry farmers". Because there was not a lot of water in New Mexico, they farmed using as little water as possible, which restricted what they could grow. Because of this, they mainly would farm many types of corn, beans and squash. They would use pottery to hold their food and water.