Lost Limbs Foundation

Monday, February 11, 2013

Your Daily Giant 2/11/2013

We thank Fritz Zimmerman, author of the Nephilim chronicles for the following account. It is from the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of Ethnology Report 1890-91. The beehive stone mounds found in this burial mound are just like stone cairns found up and down the East Coast, that have been miraculously turned into farmers clearing piles by archaeologists. Oh, and there just happened to be a "not less than" 7 foot skeleton found in the mound. #Smithsonian Blows
..located on the farm of Rev. T.F. Nelson, in the northwest part of the county, and about a mile and a half southeast of Patterson. It stood on the bottom land of the Yadkin, about 100 yards from the river, and was almost a true circle in outline, 38 feet in diameter, but not exceeding at any point 18 inches in height. The thorough excavation made, in which Mr. Rogan, the Bureau agent, was assisted by Dr. J.M. Spainhour, of Lenoir, showed that the original constructers had first dug a circular pit about 38 feet in diameter to the depth of 3 feet and there placed the dead, some in stone cist and others unenclosed, and afterwards covered them over, raising a slight mound above the pit. A plan of the pit, showing the stone graves and skeletons as they appeared after the removal of the dirt and before being disturbed, is given in figure. 207......No. 16 was unenclosed "squatter" of unusually large size, not less than 7 feet high when living.
Your Daily Giant  2/11/2013

We thank Fritz Zimmerman, author of the Nephilim chronicles for the following account. It is from the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of Ethnology Report 1890-91. The beehive stone mounds found in this burial mound are just like stone cairns found up and down the East Coast, that have been miraculously turned into farmers clearing piles by archaeologists. Oh, and there just happened to be a "not less than" 7 foot skeleton found in the mound. #Smithsonian Blows
..located on the farm of Rev. T.F. Nelson, in the northwest part of the county, and about a mile and a half southeast of Patterson. It stood on the bottom land of the Yadkin, about 100 yards from the river, and was almost a true circle in outline, 38 feet in diameter, but not exceeding at any point 18 inches in height. The thorough excavation made, in which Mr. Rogan, the Bureau agent, was assisted by Dr. J.M. Spainhour, of Lenoir, showed that the original constructers had first dug a circular pit about 38 feet in diameter to the depth of 3 feet and there placed the dead, some in stone cist and others unenclosed, and afterwards covered them over, raising a slight mound above the pit. A plan of the pit, showing the stone graves and skeletons as they appeared after the removal of the dirt and before being disturbed, is given in figure. 207......No. 16 was unenclosed "squatter" of unusually large size, not less than 7 feet high when living.