Lost Limbs Foundation

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Woolpit Well, Suffolk U.K
This Suffolk village is thought to take its name from pits dug to trap wolves. The area is said to be the haunt of one such animal, trapped and killed centuries ago. A farmer once claimed to have seen it emerge from a hole in the ground. He rushed for his gun, but lost it in the moonlight. As it had left no footprints, he concluded that he had seen a phantom wolf.
The site became an Ancient Monument in 1978, despite the area of the well being overgrown: the well itself only being identified as being beneath a rotten wooden board. Consequently access to the well was difficult until 1989-1991 when preservation work was done. The work commenced in 1989, and has improved access and preservation considerably. The area now being designated as a Nature Reserve. This preservation work was carried out by English Heritage, Suffolk Wildlife Trust, Mid Suffolk Council, Parish Council and brewers Ruddles.

The well is composed of a ...
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Woolpit Well, Suffolk U.K
This Suffolk village is thought to take its name from pits dug to trap wolves. The area is said to be the haunt of one such animal, trapped and killed centuries ago. A farmer once claimed to have seen it emerge from a hole in the ground. He rushed for his gun, but lost it in the moonlight. As it had left no footprints, he concluded that he had seen a phantom wolf. 
The site became an Ancient Monument in 1978, despite the area of the well being overgrown: the well itself only being identified as being beneath a rotten wooden board. Consequently access to the well was difficult until 1989-1991 when preservation work was done. The work commenced in 1989, and has improved access and preservation considerably. The area now being designated as a Nature Reserve. This preservation work was carried out by English Heritage, Suffolk Wildlife Trust, Mid Suffolk Council, Parish Council and brewers Ruddles.

The well is composed of a square structure of grey stone work of about a foot depth. A metal grid with chicken wire has been wielded over the opening to the well. Obviously to prevent it becoming clogged with leaves, and anything or one falling in! The water is clear, and flows in a Northerly direction through a square aperture, large enough to insert ones hand to sample the water, into a small stream that feeds the moat.

The Our Lady’s Well at Woolpit, in its woodland setting, is a magical site. Woolpit itself is a remarkable village, steeped in history and lore. Most of its claims to fame being displayed upon the prominent village sign ( depicted ), the well is however is absent, perhaps it was difficult to depict!! the name of the village is believed, among other possible theories, to originate from a pit dug to dispose of wolves: indeed it is said that wolves are said to haunt here! The village boasts an impressive Parish church ( worthy of a visit for its surviving poppy heads alone ), a village Lock-up and ornate Victorian village well canopy. Perhaps its greatest claim to fame, is the story of the Green Children, a strange Babes-In-The-Woodsesque story that any half decent folklorist will recant at length. For those curious, the church has an original translation from the latin account which describes the appearance of the green boy and girl, of whom the former died, but the latter lived,  lost her greenness, and married a Norfolk man. This is despite only eating peas!!? A story owing perhaps more to symbolic fable than substantiated fact.
http://insearchofholywellsandhealingsprings.wordpress.com/2012/06/21/the-lady-well-of-woolpit/